Coastal Kitchen Cupboard DIY Makeover

Blogger’s note: NO REAL WOOD WAS HARMED IN THE MAKING OF THIS CUPBOARD**

This past weekend, I completed a few more projects while awaiting the granite guy’s countertop installation at mom’s house. I have been working on this piece in my kitchen for quite awhile, and am happy to finally have it done! This is the before:

Coastal Kitchen Cabinet Beforea red cupboard (made of MDF) we purchased a few years back at Jordan’s Furniture Colossal Clearance Center in Avon, Mass (if you haven’t been there, it is so definitely worth the trip! Lots of great furniture at significantly discounted prices!) This piece fits nicely in the narrow passageway between our kitchen and dining room and holds a ton of stuff like paper towels, napkins and several pieces of kitchen equipment that just won’t fit anywhere else. The problem is, since it’s in the highest traffic point of our home, it had been scratched and worn-the finish was like a plastic veneer and scratched off quite easily (and I was tired of the dark red anyway…). Time for a fix, so this is the after: a pretty, light coastal cabinet with a top created from reclaimed window shutters!

Coastal Kitchen CupboardHere is the how-I-did-it: Sanded everything down to rough up the shiny veneer plasticy surface, and sanded the edges to round them off a bit.

Sanding the edges Nothing says “mass-produced” more than sharp, clean edges on furniture. Primed with my go-to primer: Glidden Gripper (you can find this at Home Depot in the paint dept)

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Glidden Gripper Primer

The Americana Chalky paint I planned on using says it doesn’t need a primer, but the before color was so dark, and the new color was so light, I figured I had better just to be safe.

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Chalky Paint Palette DecoArt

Before I painted the entire piece, I accented the frames around the door panel inserts with the Americana Chalky Paint Called Vintage. It is a soft blue/green color that ties in beautifully with the shutter slats on the top.

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Framed Cabinet Doors with Chalky Paint

Then I applied some wallpaper wainscoting (LOVE this stuff too!) to the inside of the panels to give a more country feel to the piece. (For the DIY  how-to on using the wallpaper, click here.

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard with Wainscoting Wallpaper Panel Inserts

I then painted the entire cupboard, including the inside panels, with two coats of Americana Chalky paint in the color Everlasting-so soft and pretty white.

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Chalky Paint for Knob Americana

The more I used this paint, the more I love it. No brush strokes, so easy to apply and clean up. I then sanded the edges to give it a bit of character and contrast.

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Wainscoting Wallpaper Doors

The final coat was the Americana Ultra Matte Varnish from DecoArt. No shine, protects the white paint from fingerprints.

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Ultra Matte Varnish Americana

For the star of this show, the top, I used some old shutter slats that Coach and I had picked up off the side of the road on a drive to Cape Cod. That was one of my very first blog posts, and also one of the first times we trash picked on the side of the road. What a score! The colors are all the original ones-so coastal pretty!!

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Arranging Shutter Slats

I have been using parts of them for several projects, including some little hanging chalkboards which I decided to reclaim for this project. As I was arranging the slats on the top, my original plan was to flip the chalkboard ones over and use the reverse side. But then I thought, why not just leave them so I could write cute little sayings on the surface? Fun!

Coastal Cupboard Makeover Chalkboard

Once I had placed all of the slats, there were a few that hung over the edges, which I quickly remedied with a few jigsaw cuts.

Cutting Shutter slats with jigsawThen sanded the edge smooth with my Black & Decker Mouse sander, which I also picked up at my local Home Depot.  Honestly, I spend more time at Home Depot and Home Goods than I do at home!!

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Cut Shutter Slat Edges

While I was sanding, I made sure that I sanded the top edge just a bit so that the cut pieces had the same worn edge as the rest. (this is the area that fits into the frame of the shutters when they are whole).

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Mouse Sander Edges

Once they were cut and sanded, I glued them into place with this strong sticky stuff-didn’t even require any nailing!!

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard Wood Glue

The original knobs were a nice heavy iron, but I wanted something lighter so there wasn’t as much of a contrast. These mercury glass knobs I found at (where else) HomeGoods, but I couldn’t find handles for the doors that I really liked.

Home Goods Mercury KnobsSo, I grabbed a pair of stainless ones I kept from my old kitchen and painted them with the chalk paint. What, you say?! Painted knobs? But, of course! This week’s Tuesday DIY Tip: you can paint any hardware quickly and easily, especially with this chalk paint! You just paint it on, Painting knobs with chalk paintmaking sure you get in all the tiny holes and crevices, then wipe it off,

Wiping off Chalk Paintallow to dry and done. Wipe away as much or as little depending on the look you are going for.

Painted knobs with chalky paintThe finished cupboard now stands in the space under my incredible driftwood mirror I purchased at (where else) HomeGoods a few months back, along with some other coastal-inspired decor.

Coastal Kitchen Cupboard After Shutter Slat Top PM

Which will all go so nicely in my coastal dream home (if I ever get a coast dream home…) In the meantime, have a dreamy Tuesday, everyone!! Susan

**PS: That disclaimer at the top of this article is for all the wood enthusiasts who think that no wood furniture should ever be painted…

 

WoW! Wainscoting Wallpaper!

Coach and I recently purchased this country-style cupboard at auction for…wait for it…$10!!! It was pretty grimy and the front doors were missing, but I just fell in love with the detail in the top trim and base.

Country Cupboard Before PaintingThe color was a faded and chipped greenish-mustardy yellow with some sort of stenciling on it. So not country pretty, so time for a makeover. First step, clean it up! Second step, I had to remove the middle piece of wood where the now-MIA doors would have normally closed and latched. (If anyone knows what that piece is actually called, let me know : )

Country Cupboard Middle trim pieceIt was easy to pop out with a tap of a hammer, but there was a wood spindle at the base that needed removing, since I wasn’t planning on replacing the doors.

Removing Spindle from Door(This is the point when Bartlet the Frenchie was exiled into the hall closet, as he was none too pleased with the noise of the saw and kept trying to attack it!)

Bartlet the French BulldogEasily done with a small saw, then I patched up the holes and was good to go. The first coat, my go-to primer, Glidden Gripper. It covers lots of sins : )

Glidden Gripper PrimerAmazing how one coat of primer can change the entire look of a piece! See how the detail pops with the clean, white paint!?

Country Cupboard Primed DetailMy finish paint choice? A lovely shade of creamy white called Snowfall White by Benjamin Moore in a matte finish.

Benjamin Moore Snowfall White

If Linen White and White Dove were married and had painty children, this is the color they would be. Before I applied the top coat, I decided I wanted to add some sort of trim or wainscoting to the back panels to give the cupboard a bit more interest. I went searching through Lowes (well, first I scoured the basement workshop and the barn but came up empty handed there), where I perused all sorts of wood, metal and vinyl options. I wanted something simple and lightweight to install that would give a nice finished look. At Lowes I discovered this roll of faux paintable, pre-pasted wallpaper wainscoting by Allen & Roth. Score!

Allen & Roth Paintable Wallpaper WainscotingIt looks like a regular roll of paper, but It had the feel of foam, so it is very lightweight and easy to cut with scissors. No dragging out my saw and sanding down edges, then gluing and nailing in place. Just measure, cut, dip and paste. Perfect.

Measuring Faux Wainscoting

Simple to cut, just measured it out, marked with a pencil and used scissors.

Faux Wainscoting Measure and CutDipped it in a warm bath in the sink for 30 seconds, then removed it and allowed it to sit for 3 minutes to allow the glue to really gel up.

Dipping Wallpaper in Warm BathThis is some seriously sticky and gluey glue! The panels went on so easily over the primed surface, and since I had already premeasured and cut, no additional trimming was necessary. I just placed the paper into position and used a damp sponge to wipe it down and remove any excess glue.

Wiping Faux Wainscoting with damp spongeAccording to the instructions, I waited 24 hours prior to painting, then I painted the entire piece with the Snowfall White.

Painting Faux WainscotingAnd folks, this really does look like raised wood wainscoting!

Faux Wainscoting PrimedThis painted piece is so much better, BUT, I am not finished.

Country Cupboard Painted

I need to decide on an accent glazing color, and I am open for suggestions. Red, lavender, gray, blue, brown, what color would you choose to enhance the beautiful trim and the wainscoting without changing the overall feel of the cupboard? I am loving the white, but it needs just a touch of something!

Country Cupboard Trim Detail

And this needs to be completed quickly, as Easter is fast approaching, so time is of the essence. Help! Susan

Anchors Away Vintage Cabinet

summer porch nautical themeAnother DIY project for the summer porch (if it ever gets above freezing around here so we can actually use the porch). This is the before, one of those old tin wall cabinets that someone had painted an awful shade of mustard neon yellow.

Nautical Cabinet Mustard Yellow Before

And this is the now: an Anchors Away Rolling Cabinet!

Nautical Cabinet Side view Stripes

A pretty dramatic transformation, yes? Here is the how-I-did-it:

1. Attached wheels to the base of the cabinet so it can roll easily

Nautical Cabinet Wheels

2. Painted with Glidden Gripper primer. This stuff works on wood or metal. Painted a coat of Benjamin Moore Snowfall white over the primer.

Antique Table Gripper Primer

3. For the sides, I decided to add a nautical stripe effect, so I taped the 2″ stripes over the white and painted with a custom (by me!) deep blue.

Nautical Cabinet Taping Stripes

Nautical Cabinet Blue Striping on Sides

4. For the front doors, I painted two layers of blue paint, a solid base and then a dry-brushed topcoat to create more depth of color.

5. For the anchor stencil. I needed to look no further than my HomeGoods shopping bag!

Nautical Cabinet Anchor Stencil Home Goods Bag

I buy these all the time, and for 99 cents they can’t be beat. I usually use them for toting stuff around, but since the anchor was the perfect size, I figured why not? I’ve got plenty more where those came from! So I used the cut-out anchor for the stencil, affixing it to the cabinet with some temporary craft adhesive,

Nautical Cabinet Spray Adhesive for Stencilthen sponging paint on with a regular sponge.

Nautical Cabinet Stencil Removed

The roping I created from my PicMonkey Photo Editor. This anchor design is very similar to the one I used, so I’m sharing that in case you would like to create one of these too!

Nautical Anchor and Roping Design6. I printed the design on regular printer paper, then affixed a sheet of freezer paper to it with some spray adhesive, just to give it more strength. Cut out the stencil with an exacto knife.

Nautical Cabinet Cutting Stencil

7. Affixed the stencil to the cabinet with painter’s tape, dabbed the white with a piece of sponge until the white was deep against the dark blue.

Nautical Cabinet Completed Anchor and Rope Stencil

For the twisted rope, I cut the pattern from the HomeGoods bag (it has two sides : )

Nautical Cabinet Cutting Rope Pattern

and taped that to the cabinet.

Nautical Cabinet Taping Rope Pattern

Nautical Cabinet Chalk Outline Roping

Outlined with chalk, then took a small, tapered sponge piece

Nautical Cabinet Trimmed Sponge

and followed along the lines, dabbing with the white paint to create the rope effect.

Nautical Cabinet Sponging between lines

The great part about using chalk is that once the paint is dried, the chalk just wipes away with a damp sponge.

Nautical Cabinet Rope Completed

For the top, I used some light balsa wood pieces that I affixed with glue.

Nautical Cabinet Balsa for top

I wanted that beachy, weathered appearance, so I added some blues mixed with water just to give it an aged effect.

Nautical Cabinet Swirled Paint and Water

Nautical Cabinet Glazing Supplies for Top

Then I glazed the top with a mixture of Martha Stewart Glaze and 2 paints, one white, one metallic silver to create that aged, driftwoody look I was going for.

Nautical Cabinet Weathered Top

With the glaze, you just paint it on, then wipe off what you don’t want

Nautical Cabinet Wiping Glaze off Top

The original handles were 1950’s chrome, which would have been perfectly fine.

Nautical Cabinet Chrome Handles

Instead, I used some brass grommets, one in each hole. I had do do a bit of drilling to make the holes larger, and then glued them into place.

Nautical Cabinet Grommets in Place Added some nautical roping to create the handles. Plus, it mimics the roping in the stenciled design. Perfect!

Nautical Cabinet Rope Handles in place

A bit of DIY FYI: when you are cutting twisted rope, tape the end before you cut, otherwise it will untwist!

Nautical Cabinet Cutting Rope Taped Ends

For the inside, I just painted it to match, then decopaged the shelves with some pretty blue tile paper I picked up at Michaels-4 for $1!

Nautical Cabinet DecPage and paper

Then I added a Martha Stewart Gloss finish just to waterproof the paper.

Nautical Cabinet Martha Stewart Gloss Finish

This cabinet is plenty big enough to hold cups, plates and glasses and an ice bucket for the porch.

Nautical Cabinet Interior Storage

The finished cabinet is perfect on our Nautical Summer porch, right at home with our white wicker seating and the Whale Coffee Table!

summer porch nautical theme

And. perhaps someday soon, we will be able to sit out on the porch and enjoy some much-anticipated warm weather! But for now, I hope you enjoyed my DIY Anchors Away Cabinet Project! Have a warm Wednesday, everyone! I know I will because I am headed to sunny California!!!  Susan

 

Antiqued Mirror on the Wall

Antiqued Mirror Completed PM

Who’s the fairest (and most rustic, vintage and gorgeous!) of them all? This mirror was another “throw-away” Coach found “somewhere”. I don’t ask anymore. It’s like a magic cupboard-I need something, I open up the barn door and voila! Instant DIY subject! Today’s project was this old, dirty, chipping and peeling dark brown mahogany mirror. Despite it’s sorry, drab exterior in dire need of some TLC, the actual structure itself was totally solid and quite heavy, I might add. I transformed it from this in a few simple, easy steps.

Antiqued Mirror BeforeHere is the How-I-Did-It: 1. Cleaned the mirror and frame thoroughly with heavy duty cleanser. The mirror is not in perfect condition, but that’s fine by me. Adds to the charm, and it stills reflects the light, which is most important. Lightly sanded the frame just to remove any loose particles of old varnish.

2. Primed with Gripper by Glidden. LOVE this stuff. Seals in stains, odors, evens the color and preps the wood to accept the topcoat.

Glidden Gripper Primer3. Painted with one coat of Glidden Antique Beige

Glidden Antique Beige Can

that I added my “chalk-like-paint” mixture to. It is a nice, soft, matte finish that accepts glazes and waxes very well. That recipe here:

Antiqued Mirror Painted

4. Added the unfinished medallion to the top for detail.

Antique Mirror Unfinished MedallionI purchased this one at Michaels for a couple of bucks. Just glued it on with Gorilla Glue . You have to brush it on, then weight it down

Antiqued Mirror Glueing Downand wait until it’s dry to ensure a good solid bond. Then I painted it with the same Glidden top coat and allowed to dry.

Antiqued Mirror Medallion Primed5. Lightly sanded the whole mirror frame and detail to expose some of the dark wood beneath.

Antiqued Mirror Detail Sanded 26. Painted on this Antique Wax in Scrub Pine from General Finishes. I like this one because you don’t have to work it in with a rag. You literally paint it on!

Antiqued Mirror Scrub Pine Antique WaxBrushed it on with a foam brush, then wiped off with a rag, leaving the dark wax in places to enhance all of the crevices and lines and detail.

Antiqued Mirror Glazed and Sanded

It leaves some color, but it also adds a nice matte finish to the entire piece. Allowed to dry.

7. Scraped off the excess paint and stain insdie the frame of the mirror. Cleaned the mirror.

Antiqued Mirror Scraping Glass8. Here is the finished closeup of my antiqued mirror. I love it, but what do you think? Should I have left it alone or did I give this piece some love? (BTW, if anyone knows the trick to photographing mirrors without me being in the shot, I would love to hear it!!!)

Antiqued Mirror Top Details

This is a very simple DIY project, it just takes some time and a little patience to allow each layer to dry before adding the next. If you are thinking of trying this process, test it out on a sample piece of wood before taking on a big, detailed mirror or frame. But remember, it’s supposed to look old and messy, so perfection is not an option! Sometimes a little messy is a good thing… Hope you have a reflective Thursday, everyone! Susan

Time Out!

Coach and I took time out of our busy holiday schedule to attend another Crown Auction on Sunday. After the auction, where we scored 3 awesome pieces of vintage furniture, including this little beauty,

French Provincial Side Table

I remarked to Coach how happy I am to see all of the old, worn, broken, dusty, tired items being purchased for re-use and re-purposing. Perhaps even 10 years ago, you would have seen many of the furniture items that were sold on Sunday in someone’s trash pile-unloved and unwanted. But, with the resurgence of DIY and so many new painting and finishing techniques on the blogs and Pinterest, everything old is new again! Case in point: Coach found this little child’s TIME OUT chair that was ready for the trash heap at a local yard sale.

Time Out Chair Before

It was weathered, gray and faded, and looked like it had been set outside in a time out corner years ago.But, with a thorough cleaning, some fresh paint, some crackle glaze and a pretty new cushion, this time out chair is now a comfortable fireside chair for reading or even playing some video games.

Time Out Chair with Bear PM

Here is the how-I-did-it:

1.Cleaned the chair and sanded lightly just to even the surface and get rid of the raised TIME OUT lettering.

2. Added a base coat of Glidden Gripper Glidden Gripperprimer to seal it.

3. Used Martha Stewart crackle medium all over the piece.

Martha Stewart Crackle Effect

Just brush over the base coat wherever you want the top coat to crackle to give an aged appearance and expose the base coat. The heavier coat of the glaze you paint on, the deeper and larger the cracks will appear. For the complete DIY info on that process, click here:

4. Added the top coat, in this case a Behr Paint pot in pale aqua blue I had picked up at Home Depot for a previous project. Those little pots of paint go a long way!

Time Out Chair Base CoatWhen you first brush it on over the base coat and glaze, it just looks like a painted piece. But slowly, the cracks begin to emerge.

Time Out Chair Crackle FinishYou can see that I left the seat unpainted, as I am adding a seat cushion to it. But notice the uneven paint, the cracks and crackles. This is the weathered effect I was going for.

Time Out Chair Crackled Finish

5. Instead of re-creating this as a TIME OUT chair, I wanted to create a welcoming spot for a small child. So I fashioned a little cushion using some foam core board that was cut to the size of the seat of the chair, some poly batting and a piece of black and white toile I had on hand.

Time Out Chair with cushion6. Since I wanted the toile to appear a faded blue, I decided to dye it with some diluted paint, the same color as the chair. (You know how you splatter latex paint on your nice new jeans and then you can’t get it off, ever? Same thing applies here.) I just added some paint to a bowl of warm water and stirred til mixed.

Time Out Chair paint and water mixture

7.Dropped in the fabric and allowed to soak for a couple of minutes to absorb the paint.

Time Out Chair fabric in paint bath

8. Rinsed it thoroughly until the water ran clear but there was just a hint of blue in the fabric. Wanted to make sure no-one ended up with a little blue butt! Then threw it in the dryer on high heat to set the color.

Time Out Chair rinsing fabric

9. I pressed it out and added some fusible interfacing just to stiffen it a bit to hold its shape.

Time Out Chair Fusible Interfacing

10. Attached the fabric to the foam core board and then attached that to the chair with some hot glue to keep it securely in place.

Time Out Chair Back

There you have it! A perfect little fireside seat for a special little someone. So, the next time you see an old piece of furniture that has seen better days, take a time out and think about the endless DIY possibilities!

Time Out Chair with Bear PM

And now it’s time to head out and hit the stores before we get buried in fresh snow! Hope you won’t have a lot of shoveling to do! Susan

 

The Glidden Project

Glidden Autumn Paint ChipBack in October, I spied this insert from Glidden Paints inside the Halloween issue of Country Living Magazine The brilliant autumn-inspired colors in the ad caught my eye, as did their interactive Country Living October 2012website, so I blogged about it. Well, the good people at Glidden saw my blog (yay!) and asked if I would be interested in doing a room makeover using their paint brand. They would send me the paints of my choice, I would paint it myself and then write about the experience. Now, those of you who read my blog know that I am a one-paint kind of decorista. Over the years I have tried just about every paint brand, only to keep returning to my personal favorite. But, since I had been contemplating a facelift for our family room anyway, it seemed like the perfect time to sieze an amazing opportunity to try something new and write a blog for the whole world to see (well, maybe not the whole world, but at least my blogging world).

Here’s the story: The last time we re-painted the family room, I had decided to add an accent color to the fireplace wall.

Glidden Before Mantel

At the time, it worked to enhance the fireplace and mantel that were viewable from the kitchen, which was the same color. However, last fall we converted our adjacent deck to a screened-in porch, which we LOVE, but any natural light we had streaming into the picture window wasGlidden porch

greatly diminished, making the room darker and less appealing. Along with that, I had changed the sofa slipcover from this light toile print

Glidden Blue Toile

to a brick red solid, creating a cavernous feel.

Glidden Brick Red Sofa

 Of course, that was not my intent. The original blue slipcover that came with the sofa we bought back in 2005 was too flowery for this more “countrified” space, and the red slipcover I purchased online looked a lot brighter on my computer screen than in person. Bright, cheerful color is my thing…dark and gloomy, not so much. And several of the decorating elements in the room- like this hand-carved whale-also creamy white, just faded into the walls, which were the same color as the trim. Glidden Whale

Time for a change. The new colors I chose were Antique Beige Glidden Antique Beige

for the walls, because I needed a color just a shade or two darker than the trim but still bright and light, and this one has just a hint of pink, and Steel Blue for the accents to match the rugs and curtains that I was planning to keep. Glidden Steel Blue

I kept the trim, fireplace and bookcases the same creamy white semi-gloss. But before I could paint the wall, I had to do a wee bit of patching since I had made some pretty big screw holes while hanging a mirror awhile back.

IMG_5957

A hole this big cannot just be filled with putty, you actually need to use some of this mesh tape to bridge it, and give it something to grab onto.

Mesh Spackling Tape

Patching the Hole

Once the putty was dry and sanded, I used this Glidden Primer called Gripper . (I had given this a High Five For Friday awhile ago-see Primed for Success...)

Glidden Gripper CanIt has a school-glue consistency, covers everything and seals in stains and dark colors, yet it is water-based for easy cleanup.

Blue wall with Gripper Primer

I was able to paint all of these shelves that were stained and polyurethaned over 25 years ago-without even sanding them!

Shelving

IMG_5965

Amazing stuff.  Next up was two coats of the eggshell finish Antique Beige Glidden. Having stated above that I have been using the same paint brand for years, I have to tell you that I was very happily surprised by how great this paint is! I typically judge my paint by the several factors listed below; in each case, the Glidden paint passed with flying colors!

1.Drippiness: Minimal dripping and splattering, both from the brush and the rollers (foam and low nap), even from up high on the ladder.

2.Sagging: No sagging at all (that’s when you roll or brush the paint on, then look back a minute or two later and find that the paint is literally     sagging from the wall, which you then have to go and redo before it sets).

3.Ease of Use: The paint rolled and brushed on smoothly and quickly, covered beautifully, cleaned up easily with soap and water.

4.Overall Depth of Color. The color is deep and even and the eggshell finish has just enough glow so the light from the window is refracted- exactly what I needed to brighten up the room!

Coach walked in after I was done (yup, the interior painting is my thing, he sticks to the outdoors), and said “wow, this looks really amazing!”, which, if you know coach, is a lot for him to say… Sooo, this is the before:

Glidden Blue Wall Before

Bookcases Dark

But you will have to come back tomorrow for the after : ) Happy last minute shopping everyone!!! Susan

Primed for Success

OK, so back to the Hall of Shame Project…we are getting closer. Time to paint the balusters that have been covered with the drippings from the Minwax Antique Refinisher I used a while back to strip the railings. I don’t know about all of you, but I HATE prep work. The stripping, sanding, tack cloth wiping.. and the prospect of prepping all of those white poles was daunting. 

Then I remembered a product that my design instructor had mentioned: Gripper, By Glidden, this week’s High Five for Friday!

It is an interior/exterior primer, sealer, all-purpose stain killer and bonder for walls, woods, masonry, glass and previously painted metals. If you have a surface to prime, they’ve got it covered. And you don’t even have to sand!!! Just so long as it’s clean and dirt/oil free, you are good to go. OK, I am soooo in. Upon opening the can, I discovered that it is essentially odorless (although it does have all of those “harmful if inhaled warnings”), and the consistency of white school glue.

It glides on easily and smoothly, and leaves a nice, even coat. It even covered all of those brown drip marks on the first try!!

This is DIY magic in a can : ) So if any of you are attempting to complete a major renovation in the next week leading up to Thanksgiving (I know, who is dumb enough to do that?!?) then get to your local big box store and grab some Gripper! And while you’re at it, could you find me someone who will install carpeting in time for Turkey Day? TGIF everyone!! Susan

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